Writers should share experiences

  • How many sales do you make a day, a week, a year?
  • What do you charge for your book?
  • Should you give your e-book away free?
  • Where do Kindle and other e-book users hang out?
  • How do we get in touch with them and get them to buy our books?
  • Do we utilise all media to its full potential?
  • Should self-publishers/Indies be grouping together to sell as a collective?
  • Do you need to be playing the long-game?
  • Should we be sharing more or is selfishness a necessity in online marketing?
  • Are we really on the brink of a publishing revolution or is it just all pie in the sky?

There’s an oft used but badly implemented process across similar businesses, particularly in places like the NHS, Universities and the Public Sector. And that is sharing best practice. I know a lot of you do this already and the stuff you put up is really helpful to the rest of us.

But some of you, well you just don’t get it.

For those of you who don’t know, sharing best practice is: letting other people know what works and what doesn’t. It allows a collective of similar interests to give the best service they can to their customers based on everyone’s experience…aka it’s giving away what you know.

As individual writers, unless we strike it lucky, we’re a bunch of pie munching failures who sit at our computers typing away most of the day, staring gloomily into the muse-o-sphere, creating our strange worlds and hoping for the impossible.

If we work together, if we share what we know, we can make this publishing revolution our own.

Publishers hate us

Let’s face it, they do. What’s more, they’re scared of us. We’re the zombies in the mall, the vampires slowly taking over the suburbs, the virus in the water system.

Now we seem to have destiny in our own hands, and these guys…well they can’t quite figure out what to do about it. If they could put a literary stake through our collective heart, they’d do it with a Van Helsing cry of triumph. You see we’re muddying the pool. We’re complicating things. We’re the fly in the ointment…God I just love those clichés.

So stop tweeting or blogging about what you had for supper. Start talking about the things that matter to us. Let us know your successes, but also let us know about your failures. Share best practice – tell us what works and what doesn’t.

SHARING works. With twitter and facebook and blogs we have a great environment to exploit the digital world. Publishers and agents will be pulling out their hair and I really don’t care. They’ve had their time.
Of course, I offer my sincere apologies to people who already do this and have been for some while.

I seen yah.

I know who you are.

God bless your little creative cotton socks.

You’re pretty damn good. You deserve the chance to succeed.

And who’s to say, you can’t?

Be good to each other. Form your little networks and Indie Publishing thingies. But above all, share. Sharing is good. Don’t be afraid. Be confident in yourself as a writer and be benevolent enough to grant access to your own particular wisdom.

6 thoughts on “Writers should share experiences

  1. Yes, yes, yes! (forgive the ‘When Harry Met Sally’ moment). I try to share – but like you say – it’s a confidence thing a lot of the time. Who wants to listen to lil ol me? Thanks for kick up the bahookie. I do blog about how it is/was for me (amongst other things and I’ve just finished a series of articles for ezine ‘Words with Jam’ on getting started with writing. Maybe next it should be ‘going it alone’ publishing tips. I try to mix tweets – networking, personal engagement and writing stuff. Thanks for call to arms. Great post, again.

  2. Loads of people want to listen to you Anne, you have something to say

  3. Woahoa! Great post! I pulled my weight straight away and blogged my 15 do’s and don’ts on my blog. http://floatingrobes.blogspot.com/2011/01/this-is-how-i-do-it-pulling-our-self.html Thanks again!Marcel

  4. Good article on your site Marcel, thanks for the read.

  5. From a publisher gone blogging… I closed the printed edition of the small, local newspaper I’ve produced these past two years to publish exclusively online. The 32-page paper was free on the stands, except what we charged our advertisers and now I’m struggling with ways to get myself and my writers paid – hate to ask for subscriptions, but… Blogging is a new experience for me. As editor, I never had much time to do a lot of writing, unless it was to cover a last minute news story, as I was also laying the publication out in Quark, handling distribution, etc.. It’s amazing what I’ve learned from your posts just these past two days. Thank you so much.

  6. As long as you don’t take my word as gospel!!!! Thanks for the comment though

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